Thursday, August 1, 2013

Usman Khawaja dismissal: Cricket Australia lodges complaint after howler of all howlers

Howler: wicketkeeper Matt Prior celebrates with team mates Ian Bell (L) and Jonathan Trott after dismissing Usman Khawaja.

Howler: wicketkeeper Matt Prior celebrates with team mates Ian Bell (L) and Jonathan Trott after dismissing Usman Khawaja. Photo: Getty Images

Cricket Australia chief executive James Sutherland has sought a please-explain from the International Cricket Council over a flabbergasting umpiring decision that saw Usman Khawaja sent on his way on the first day of the third Test.

We understand and accept that from time to time mistakes can be made, however in this instance, on behalf of the player, the team and all cricket fans, we feel duty bound to seek further explanation as to how this decision was arrived at. 

Khawaja's dismissal before lunch was mystifying and maddening.

Cricket Australia CEO James Sutherland.

Cricket Australia CEO James Sutherland. Photo: Getty Images

If New Zealand umpire Tony Hill's raising of the finger, adjudging Khawaja to have edged a Graeme Swann delivery to England wicketkeeper Matt Prior was not bad enough, the decision by third umpire Kumar Dharmasena not to overrule it after the batsman had called for a review was barely believable.

Advertisement

There was no Hot Spot evidence of contact with the bat, nor a noise or deviation from the bat, and in fact replays showed Khawaja's bat had instead flicked his pad, hence the Snickometer reading of a slight sound just before the ball arrived.

Dharmasena, who just happens to be the ICC's umpire of the year, saw something else, however, and ordered the Australian No.3 to depart.

Khawaja was furious as he left and CA, sharing his displeasure, made the rare move of lodging an official complaint.

"Cricket Australia has sought an explanation from the ICC on the dismissal of Usman Khawaja. In our view, the on-field decision and referred decision using DRS were both incorrect," Sutherland said in a statement issued after play.

"CA remains a strong supporter of DRS and believes it is important that cricket continues to improve and build confidence in the DRS.

Khawaja walks off despite no evidence that he hit the ball.

Khawaja walks off despite no evidence that he hit the ball. Photo: Getty Images

"We understand and accept that from time to time mistakes can be made, however in this instance, on behalf of the player, the team and all cricket fans, we feel duty bound to seek further explanation as to how this decision was arrived at."

Australia, 2-82 at the time of Khawaja's exit, recovered via a wonderful partnership between Michael Clarke (125 not out) and Steve Smith (69 not out) to be in a strong position at 3-303 by the close of play.

Smith was also spared by a couple of highly debatable umpiring decisions, both also made by Hill, but they were not in the league of Khawaja's.

It was a more serious mistake than the one that allowed Stuart Broad to survive a clear edge at Trent Bridge because on that occasion only the on-ground umpire had erred, with Australia out of reviews and unable to appeal that decision. On this occasion, even slow-motion replays and the technology at his disposal could not prevent Dharmasena from the howler of all howlers.

"(Khawaja) said he didn't hit it and I said he didn't hit it. And that was about it," said Chris Rogers, who scored an attractive 84 and was at the other end when Khawaja was given out by Hill.

"I was (surprised). I was up the other end. Even in real time I didn't think he hit it. I didn't think he was anywhere near it. The umpire must have had a different view on it but I thought it was not out and that's why we reviewed it. From what we saw on the replays I think even the England guys had given up hope of it being out. It was disappointing."

Rogers, who correctly declined to review his own lbw dismissal by Swann in a call that Hill got right, said the Khawaja episode was "another question mark, I guess" on the Decision Review System.

"It's a weird thing because I guess it's people's careers on the line as well," Rogers said. "You want these decisions to be right. I felt for him but it's been happening so we've just got to get on with it and not worry about that and try to have a good day.

Asked whether players had lost confidence in the process Rogers added: "Um, it's a hard one to answer. I still think it's important. We want technology to make sure these decisions are correct and sometimes it goes for you and sometimes it goes against you and you just have to take it."

The umpiring pool for the Ashes is diluted due to eight of 12 umpires on the ICC elite panel being Australian or English and therefore not neutral.

Poll: How would you describe the Usman Khawaja dismissal? The howler of all howlers

76%

Not good but not the end of the world

17%

Nothing to worry about, umpiring mistakes are part of the game

7%

Total votes: 1112.

Would you like to vote?

You will need Cookies enabled to use our Voting Feature.

Would you like to vote?

You will need Javascript enabled to use our Voting Feature.

Poll closes in 4 days.

Disclaimer:

These polls are not scientific and reflect the opinion only of visitors who have chosen to participate.


http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/34702/f/644564/s/2f728cf2/sc/13/l/0L0Scanberratimes0N0Bau0Csport0Ccricket0Cusman0Ekhawaja0Edismissal0Ecricket0Eaustralia0Elodges0Ecomplaint0Eafter0Ehowler0Eof0Eall0Ehowlers0E20A130A80A20E2r2sg0Bhtml/story01.htm
jika diwebsite ini anda menemukan artikel dengan informasi dan konten yang salah, tidak akurat, bersifat menyesatkan, bersifat memfitnah, bersifat asusila, mengandung pornografi, bersifat diskriminasi atau rasis mohon untuk berkenan menghubungi kami di sini agar segera kami hapus.
◄ Newer Post Older Post ►
 

© KAWUNGANTEN.COM Powered by Blogger